NJ Shelter Regulations

NEW JERSEY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND SENIOR SERVICES
Infectious and Zoonotic Program
P. O. Box 369
Trenton, New Jersey 08625

SELECTED LAWS, REGULATIONS AND INFORMATON RELATING TO RABIES AND CONTROL OF DOGS:

Part 3: Facility Operation

DIVISION OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, ENVIRONMENTAL, AND OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH SERVICES

Veterinary Public Health
N.J.A.C. 8:23A

Proposed: October 18, 1999 at 31 N.J.R. 3025(a)
Adopted: February 5, 2000 by Christine M. Grant, Commissioner, Department of Health and Senior Services
Filed: February 25, 2000 as R.2000 d.122, with substantive and technical changes not requiring additional public notice and comment (see N.J.A.C. 1:30-4.3).

Authority
N.J.S.A. 4:19-15.2A and 15.14 and 15.16A; and 4:19A-11.

Effective Date
March 20, 2000

Expiration Date
March 20, 2005

TABLE OF CONTENTS

SANITARY OPERATION OF KENNELS, PET SHOPS, SHELTERS AND POUNDS

Subchapter 1
Section

8:23A-1.1 Definitions
8:23A-1.2 Compliance
8:23A-1.3 Facilities (general)
8:23A-1.4 Facilities (indoor)
8:23A-1.5 Facilities (outdoor)
8:23A-1.6 Primary enclosures
8:23A-1.7 Feeding and watering
8:23A-1.8 Sanitation
8:23A-1.9 Disease control
8:23A-1.10 Holding and receiving animals
8:23A-1.11 Euthanasia
8:23A-1.12 Transportation
8:23A-1.13 Records and administration

SANITARY OPERATION OF KENNELS, PET SHOPS, SHELTERS AND POUNDS

Subchapter I

8:23A-1.1 Definitions
The following words and terms, as used in this chapter, shall have the following meanings, unless the context clearly indicates otherwise.
“Adult dog or cat” means a dog or cat over the age of seven months or which possesses a set of permanent teeth.
“Animal” means any animal subject to rabies or other diseases of dogs.
“Disinfection” is any process, chemical or physical, by means of which pathogenic agents or disease producing microbes are destroyed, but not necessarily resistant bacterial spores.
“Euthanasia” is the act of inducing painless death.
“Impervious surface” means a surface that does not permit the absorption of fluids. Such surfaces are those that can be thoroughly and repeatedly cleaned and disinfected, which will not retain odors, and from which fluids bead up and run off or can be removed without being absorbed into the surface material.
“Kennel” means any establishment wherein or whereupon the business of boarding or selling dogs or breeding dogs for sale is carried on, except a pet shop.
“Owner” when applied to the proprietorship of a dog means every person having a right of property in that dog and every person who has that dog in his or her keeping, and when applied to the proprietorship of any other animal, including, but not limited to, a cat, means every person having a right of property in that animal and every person who has that animal in his or her keeping.
“Pet shop” means any place of business which is not part of a kennel, wherein animals, including, but not limited to, dogs, cats, birds, fish, reptiles, rabbits, hamsters or gerbils, are kept or displayed chiefly for the purpose of sale to individuals for personal appreciation and companionship rather than for business or research purposes.
“Pound” means any establishment for the confinement of dogs or other animals seized either under the provisions of N.J.S.A. 4:19-15.16 or otherwise.
“Potable water” means water suitable for human consumption.
“Primary enclosure” means any structure used to restrict an animal or animals to a limited amount of space, such as a room, pen, run, cage or compartment.
“Shelter” means any establishment where dogs or other animals are received, housed and distributed.

8:23A-1.2 Compliance
(a) Kennels, pet shops, shelters and pounds shall comply with the provisions of these rules in the maintenance and care of all animals subject to rabies and other diseases of dogs, as well as rules, regulations and ordinances enacted by the appropriate agency or governing body of the municipality wherein they are located.
(b) A certificate of inspection, issued for the current licensing year by the local health authority indicating compliance with these rules, shall be prominently displayed at the facility in an area visible to the public. The telephone number of the inspecting local health authority shall be on the certificate.
(c) Any facility constructed or renovated after January 17, 1995 shall first undergo plan review and approval by the local health authority. This review shall be completed within 60 days by the local health authority.
(d) Facilities shall show evidence of satisfactory inspection on a yearly basis by local fire officials.

8:23A-1.3 Facilities (general)
(a) Housing facilities for animals shall be maintained in good repair, to protect the animals from injury, to contain the animals, to restrict the entrance of other animals; and location, construction, arrangement and operation shall not constitute a nuisance.
(b) Reliable and adequate electric power, if required to comply with other provisions of these rules, and adequate potable water shall be available. Facilities not receiving water from a municipal water supply system shall test their water annually, or more frequently if required by any applicable standard, in order to be proven free of coliform bacteria. One copy of the water test results shall be kept on file and made available to the State or local health department at the time of facility inspection; another copy shall be sent to the local health department.
(c) Supplies of food and bedding shall be stored in facilities which adequately protect such supplies against infestation or contamination by vermin. Refrigeration shall be provided for supplies of perishable food.
(d) Provision shall be made for the removal and disposal of animal and food wastes, bedding, dead animals and debris. Disposal facilities shall be provided and operated as to control vermin infestation, odors and disease hazards. In facilities having no refrigeration in which to store carcasses, carcasses shall be removed from the premises within 12 hours, in ambient temperatures of 45 degrees Fahrenheit and above. Carcasses being stored on the premises shall be placed in tightly closed containers to prevent the entry of insects, vermin and other animals.
(e) Facilities, such as washrooms, basins or sinks, shall be provided in the facility to maintain cleanliness among animal caretakers; hot and cold water, soap, and towels shall be provided. Toilet facilities shall be provided in the facility or nearby on the premises and shall be kept clean and in good repair.
(f) Premises (buildings and grounds) shall be kept clean and in good repair in order to protect the animals from injury and to facilitate the prescribed husbandry practices set forth in these rules and regulations. Premises shall remain free of accumulations of trash and the overgrowth of vegetation up to the property line or within 20 feet of the facility. Insects, ectoparasites, and avian and mammalian pests shall be controlled effectively.

8:23A-1.4 Facilities (indoor)
(a) Indoor animal facilities shall be provided for all pet shops, shelters and pounds. Kennels must also have indoor facilities, except for animals which the supervising veterinarian certifies are acclimated to the climatic conditions in New Jersey.
(b) Indoor housing facilities for animals shall be sufficiently heated when necessary to protect the animals from cold, and to provide for their health and comfort. Adequate heat shall mean enough heat necessary to prevent physical damage to an animal from hypothermia. The animals’ age, physical condition and hair coat shall be taken into consideration. The temperature at the height level of the animals shall not be allowed to fall below 55 degrees Fahrenheit in any indoor primary enclosures where animals are housed.
(c) Indoor housing facilities for animals shall be adequately ventilated to provide for the health and comfort of the animals at all times. Such facilities shall be provided with fresh air either by means of windows, doors, vents or air conditioning and shall be ventilated so as to minimize drafts, odors and moisture condensation. Auxiliary ventilation, such as exhaust fans and vents or air conditioning, shall be provided when the ambient temperature is 85 degrees Fahrenheit or higher. Windows and doors used for ventilation (except for guillotine doors) shall be screened to control the entrance of insects.
(d) Indoor housing facilities for animals shall have ample light, by natural or artificial means, or both, of good quality and well distributed. Such lighting shall provide uniformly distributed illumination or sufficient light intensity to permit routine inspection and cleaning during the entire working period.
(e) Primary enclosures shall be so placed as to protect the animals from excessive illumination, including natural sunlight.
(f) The interior building surfaces of indoor housing facilities shall be constructed and maintained so that they are impervious to moisture and may be readily cleaned.
(g) A suitable method shall be provided to eliminate excess water from indoor housing facilities. Drains, when used, shall be properly constructed and kept in good repair to avoid foul odors and back-up therefrom. Facilities which are not connected to a municipal sewerage system shall have a system for the disposal of animal excrement that meets all applicable standards.

8:23A-1.5 Facilities (outdoor)
(a) When sunlight is likely to cause overheating or discomfort, sufficient shade shall be provided to allow animals kept outdoors to protect themselves from the direct rays of the sun.
(b) Whenever animals are kept outdoors, they shall be provided with access to shelter to allow them to remain dry during rain or snow.
(c) In kennels where animals are housed exclusively outdoors, adequate shelter from the weather shall be provided at all times. Sufficient clean bedding material or other means of protection from the weather elements shall be provided when the atmospheric temperature falls below 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Each shelter shall be provided with a windbreak at its entrance.
(d) A suitable method shall be provided to drain surface water rapidly.
(e) Surfaces of outdoor enclosures of pet shops, shelters, pounds and boarding kennels shall be constructed and maintained so that they are impervious to moisture and may be readily cleaned and disinfected; run off from outdoor enclosures shall be disposed of, in accordance with N.J.A.C. 8:23A- 1.4(g).

8:23A-1.6 Primary enclosures
(a) Primary enclosures shall be structurally sound and maintained in good repair so as to:
1. Contain the animals;
2. Protect animals from injury;
3. Keep predators out;
4. Enable animals to remain dry and clean;
5. Permit animals convenient access to food and water as required in these rules;
6. Provide sufficient space for each animal to turn about freely and to stand, sit and lie in a comfortable normal position; and
7. Have no sharp points or edges accessible to the animals that could cause injury.
(b) In addition to the other provisions of this section each dog in any primary enclosure shall be provided a minimum square footage of floor space equal to the mathematical square of the sum of the length of the dog in inches, as measured from the tip of its nose to the base of its tail, plus six inches, expressed in square feet.
(c) Animals housed in the same primary enclosure shall be maintained in compatible groups, with the following additional restrictions:
1. Females shall not be housed in the same primary enclosure with sexually intact males, except for breeding purposes, unless otherwise requested by the owner;
2. Any animal exhibiting a vicious disposition shall be housed individually in a primary enclosure;
3. Immature animals shall not be housed in the same primary enclosure with adults other than their mothers, except when permanently maintained in breeding colonies; and
4. Animals of different species shall not be housed in the same primary enclosures.
(d) Animals shall not be placed in empty primary enclosures previously inhabited by other animals unless the enclosure has first been cleaned and disinfected.
(e) Animals showing signs of contagious illness shall be removed from rooms and enclosures containing healthy animals and housed in a separate isolation room, in accordance with N.J.A.C. 8:23A-1.9(b) through (f).
(f) The floors of primary enclosures shall be constructed so as to protect the animals’ feet and legs from injury. Enclosures may have grid-type flooring, provided that the grid material is of adequate gauge to prevent sagging under the weight of the animals and that the mesh is small enough to prevent their feet from passing through or to cause cutting injuries to the foot pads.
(g) Each adult cat housed in a primary enclosure for longer than 15 days shall be provided a minimum of seven cubic feet of cage space. A receptacle containing sufficient litter shall be provided to contain excreta.
(h) Adult dogs confined in cages of less than double the minimum standard size as stated in (c) above shall be exercised in runs at least twice a day or walked on a leash for at least 20 minutes per day.
(i) Suspect rabid animals shall be held in caging that is impermeable to the dissemination of saliva to animals housed on either side of it, with a warning sign prominently posted on the enclosure.
(j) Animals shall not be tied to fences or cages in lieu of being housed in primary enclosures.

8:23A-1.7 Feeding and watering
(a) Animals shall be fed at least once each day except as otherwise might be required to provide adequate care. Food from the previous day shall be discarded and fresh food supplied daily except when self-feeders are used, as described in (g) below.
(b) The food shall be free from contamination, wholesome, palatable, and of sufficient quantity and nutritional value to meet the normal daily requirements for the condition and size of the animals.
(c) Immature animals shall be fed in accordance with generally accepted procedures; those animals under three months of age shall be fed three times daily; those three to six months of age shall be fed twice daily.
(d) Containers of food shall be accessible to animals and shall be located so as to minimize contamination by excreta.
(e) Feeding pans shall be durable, cleaned and disinfected daily.
(f) Disposable food receptacles may be used but must be discarded after each feeding.
(g) Self-feeders may be used for the feeding of dry food and they shall be cleaned regularly to prevent molding, deterioration or caking of feed.
(h) Potable water must be accessible to animals at all times unless contraindicated by the supervising veterinarian. Receptacles for such purposes shall be cleaned daily.

8:23A-1.8 Sanitation
(a) Excreta shall be removed from primary enclosures as often as necessary to prevent contamination of the animals contained therein and to control disease hazards and odors. When cleaning, any animal contained therein shall be removed from such enclosures during the cleaning process, and adequate measures shall be taken to protect the animals in other such enclosures from being contaminated with water and other wastes.
(b) Primary enclosures for animals shall be physically cleaned often enough to prevent an accumulation of debris or excreta and to reduce to a practical minimum, agents injurious to the health of animals or humans.
(c) Cages, floors, and hard surfaced pens or runs shall be disinfected at least once per day by washing them with hot water (180 degrees Fahrenheit) and soap or detergent as in a mechanical cage washer, or by washing all soiled surfaces with a detergent solution followed by a safe and effective disinfectant, or by cleaning all soiled surfaces with live steam.
(d) Premises (buildings and grounds) shall be kept clean and in good repair in order to protect the animals from injury and disease, to facilitate the prescribed sanitary practices as set forth in these rules, and to prevent nuisances.
(e) An effective program for the control of insects, ectoparasites, and avian and mammalian pests shall be established and maintained.

8:23A-1.9 Disease control
(a) Programs of disease control and adequate health care shall be established and maintained under the supervision and assistance of a doctor of veterinary medicine. A form, developed by the State Department of Health and Senior Services, indicating that such a program is in effect at the facility, shall be signed and dated yearly by the supervising veterinarian. This form shall be posted in the facility in an area clearly visible to the public. The supervising veterinarian shall notify the local health department with jurisdiction over the licensed animal facility and the Department of Health and Senior Services in the event that disease control procedures are not being followed. The disease control program shall address both the animals’ physical and psychological well-being, including stress from auditory, visual, and olfactory stimuli.
(b) Each animal shall be observed daily by the animal caretaker in charge, or by someone under his or her direct supervision for clinical signs of communicable disease or stress. Sick, diseased, injured or lame animals shall be provided with at least prompt, basic veterinary care (that is, to alleviate pain and suffering) or euthanized, unless such action is inconsistent with the purposes for which the animal was obtained and is being held; provided, however, that this provision shall not affect compliance with N.J.S.A. 4:19-15.16, which requires all stray animals to be held for seven days. Animals displaying signs of stress shall be provided with relief pursuant to the disease control and health care program, as delineated in (a) above. Environmental stress can be mediated through reducing the negative impact of excess noise, smells, visual stimuli, and perceived threats; socialization; exercise; increased privacy; and providing comfort, such as soft bedding. Euthanized animals that have bitten a human within 10 days previous to euthanasia shall be examined for rabies at the State Department of Health and Senior Services Laboratory.
(c) Any animal under confinement for, or with signs of, a communicable disease shall be separated from other healthy animals and placed in an isolation area in order to minimize dissemination of such disease. Caretakers shall wash their hands after handling these animals and follow procedures which control the dissemination of disease as recommended by the contracting veterinarian.
(d) In facilities constructed or renovated after January 17, 1995, the isolation area shall be a separate room (with ceiling to floor walls and door) from the holding area of the general animal population, not to be used for any purposes other than the segregation of animals with signs of communicable disease.
(e) In facilities constructed or renovated after January 17, 1995, the isolation area shall have an exhaust fan or system which creates air movement from the isolation area to an area outside the premises of the facility. Removal of exhaust air from the isolation area may be accomplished by the use of existing heating and air conditioning ducts provided that no exhaust air from the isolation area is permitted to enter or mix with fresh air for use by the general animal population.
(f) Cleaning utensils for the isolation area shall be separate from those used for cleaning the general animal population area; such utensils shall either be washed separately from, or after, those used for the general population.
(g) The contracting veterinarian supervising the facility’s disease control programs shall report the diagnosis of zoonotic diseases in animals at the facility to the Health Officer of the local health department.
(h) Any person operating or employed at a kennel, pet shop, shelter or pound who observes an animal which he or she suspects of being rabid, shall at once notify by telephone the local health department or the State Department of Health and Senior Services and segregate such animal. Dogs, ferrets and cats suspected of having rabies shall be held for 10 days, unless examined by a veterinarian, or shall be humanely euthanized and tested for rabies, provided that this does not effect compliance with N.J.S.A. 4:19-15.16. Other animals shall be handled accordingly as per recommendations of the State Department of Health and Senior Services.
(i) From time to time, the Department of Health and Senior Services may issue fact sheets addressing specific zoonotic diseases to local health departments. Each local health department shall provide copies of the fact sheets to persons operating kennels, pet shops, shelters and pounds within the local health department’s jurisdiction. Persons operating kennels, pet shops, shelters and pounds shall provide, and shall arrange for their employees to provide, these fact sheets to persons adopting or purchasing animals identified in the fact sheets. Such operators may obtain additional copies of the fact sheets at no cost to them from the Department by writing to the Infectious and Zoonotic Disease Program, Division of Epidemiology, Environmental and Occupational Health, NJ Department of Health and Senior Services, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369.

8:23A-1.10 Holding and receiving of animals
(a) Steps in the protection of the public from rabies infection include:
1. Impounded animals must be kept alive for seven days to give opportunity for rabies disease surveillance and opportunity for owners to reclaim.
2. Unowned or surrendered dogs, cats or ferrets which have bitten a human shall be either held for rabies observation for 10 days following the bite or euthanized for laboratory examination for rabies, provided that this shall not affect compliance with N.J.S.A. 4:19-15.16.
3. Unowned or unwanted dogs or cats which have bitten a human shall be held for rabies observation for 10 days following the bite or euthanized for laboratory examination for rabies, provided that this provision shall not affect compliance with N.J.S.A. 4:19-15.16 which requires the holding for seven days of all stray animals.
4. The specimen to be submitted for laboratory examination is the head of a small animal such as a dog or cat, the brain of a large animal such as a horse, cow or sheep, or an entire bat. The specimen shall be carefully packaged so as to maintain refrigeration temperatures during delivery and to prevent the leakage of any body fluids to the exterior of the package. The specimen should be delivered by messenger to the State Department of Health and Senior Services Laboratory.
5. Animals brought in for elective destruction shall not be euthanized until the person in charge of the facility has determined the animal is not a stray, and that the person requesting the animal’s euthanasia is its owner or a representative with written authorization of the owner and the animal has not bitten a human within ten days or evidenced other aggressive tendencies compatible with symptoms suspicious of rabies. If the animal has bitten a human being within 10 days, the appropriate specimen shall be delivered to the laboratory.
6. The person in charge of the facility shall keep a record of evidence submitted in support of (a)5 above for a period of one year.
(b) Each shelter or pound shall post a sign establishing specific hours during which persons will be permitted to enter the facility to look at animals and records for the purpose of seeking animals that are missing:
1. The sign shall be clearly visible from the outside.
2. The hours for public access shall be at least two hours each business day Monday through Friday and two hours Saturday or Sunday, excluding legal holidays. All shelter and impoundment facilities shall make available to contracting municipalities a telephone number where residents may call to report lost animals or receive information on animals found; this telephone number shall also be listed on the posted facility sign.
3. The person who is searching for his or her missing animal shall identify himself or herself by presenting a driver’s license or other acceptable identification document.
4. The person who is searching for his or her missing animal shall furnish to the shelter or pound a written description of his or her animal and a license or other proof of ownership, such as a photograph.
5. The person who is searching for his or her missing animal shall abide by all reasonable security measures required by the shelter or pound to prevent the spread of disease.
6. In the case of claimed dogs which are unlicensed, the name and address of the owner, and a description of the dog, shall be forwarded within 30 days to the person or agency designated to enforce the licensing of dogs in the municipality of the dog owner’s residence.
7. Any impoundment facility accepting a stray animal found in a municipality not under contract with that facility shall notify, within 48 hours, the animal control officer of the municipality where the animal was found, as to the species, sex, color, breed, and other identifying features of the animal.

8:23A-1.11 Euthanasia
(a) No animal being euthanized shall be allowed to make physical contact with another animal unless pretranquilized to the extent that they are not capable of aggressive actions dangerous to humans or animals.
(b) Where standard methods of restraint are impractical or impossible (such as zoo animals, animals in severe pain from trauma, or animals that are intractable for other reasons) or where manual capture and restraint may cause pain and injury through struggling and anxiety, the use of immobilizing drugs are acceptable, except neuromuscular blocking agents as determined by N.J.S.A. 4:22-1 et seq.
(c) The acceptable methods of euthanasia include the following:
1. The primary recommended method is an intravenous injection of a barbiturate; however, an intraperitoneal or intracardiac injection may be made where intravenous injection is impractical, as in the very small animal, or in the comatose animal with depressed vascular function. Intracardiac injection is acceptable only when performed on heavily sedated, anesthetized or comatose animals. The use of neuromuscular blocking agents, as determined by N.J.S.A. 4:22-19.3, is prohibited in the animal euthanasia process.
2. Administration of injectable solutions approved for use in dogs and cats.
3. Administration of inhalant anesthetics:
i. Ether, halothane, isoflurane, enflurane, or methoxyflurane may be used. Nitrous oxide shall only be used in conjunction with other inhalant anesthetics.
ii. Acceptable for small animals such as birds, rodents, and young cats and dogs. Not recommended for larger animals.
iii. Precautions shall be taken to protect personnel and other animals from inhalant anesthetic gases. Ether is flammable and explosive. Occupational exposure to inhalant anesthetics constitutes a human health hazard.
4. Intravenous injection of combinations of chloral hydrate, magnesium sulfate and pentobarbital is acceptable for large animals, such as horses.
(d) Methods not acceptable for euthanasia include the following:
1. Hydrogen cyanide gas;
2. Injection of chloral hydrate;
3. Injection of magnesium sulfate;
4. Strychnine in any form;
5. Injection of hydrocyanic acid;
6. Electrocution;
7. Shooting and captive bolt pistol;
8. Drowning;
9. Exsanguination;
10. Decompression chambers;
11. Nitrous oxide, when used as the sole euthanasia agent;
12. Chloroform;
13. Chambers using any gas that is not an anesthetic; or
14. Neuromuscular blocking agents.
(e) All persons administering animal euthanasia shall be a New Jersey licensed veterinarian or be certified by a licensed veterinarian in the acceptable euthanasia technique or techniques used at the facility, as delineated in (c) above, in compliance with N.J.A.C. 8:65. Such documentation shall state the euthanasia substances and techniques certified for use therewith, shall be signed by the certifying veterinarian, and shall be kept on file at the facility for inspection by State or local Health authorities.

8:23A-1.12 Transportation
(a) Vehicles used in transporting animals shall have a current inspection sticker and be equipped to prevent hazards to the health of the animals being transported and to the driver and all human passengers of the vehicle. The use of portable propane, gas, or oil auxiliary heaters is prohibited in an animal control vehicle. Vehicles shall have the name, address and telephone number of the agency picking up the animals clearly visible on both the driver and passenger sides of the vehicles.
(b) The animal cargo space of all vehicles shall be so constructed and maintained as to prevent the ingress of exhaust from the vehicle’s engine.
(c) Primary enclosures used to transport animals, such as compartments or transport cages, cartons or crates, shall be well constructed and well ventilated and designed to protect the health and insure the safety of the animals. Such enclosures shall be constructed or positioned in the vehicle in such a manner that:
1. Each animal in the vehicle has access to sufficient fresh air for normal breathing and ventilation is sufficient to prevent the onset of heat prostration. The temperature within such enclosures shall not be allowed to exceed 85 degrees Fahrenheit or fall below 45 degrees for a period of more than two hours, provided, however, that at no time may an animal be transported for longer than one hour at a temperature of more than 95 degrees Fahrenheit or less than 35 degrees Fahrenheit. Vehicles which are purchased after March 20, 2000 shall be equipped with supplementary air conditioning and heating to maintain the temperature within the enclosures between 85 degrees Fahrenheit and 45 degrees Fahrenheit at all times when animals are in the enclosures. (Four years from the effective date of these rules, all vehicles shall be equipped with supplementary air conditioning and heating to maintain the temperature within the enclosures between 85 degrees Fahrenheit and 45 degrees Fahrenheit at all times when animals are in the enclosures.
2. The opening of such enclosures are easily accessible at all times for emergency removal of the animals.
3. The animals are afforded adequate protection from the elements.
(d) Animals transported in the same primary enclosure shall be maintained in compatible groups, and any animal exhibiting a vicious disposition shall be transported individually in a primary enclosure. Further, any female shall not be transported in the same primary enclosure with any male unless otherwise requested by the owner.
(e) Primary enclosures used to transport animals shall be large enough to insure that each animal contained therein has sufficient space to turn about freely, to stand erect and to lie in a natural position.
(f) Animals shall not be placed in primary enclosures over other animals in transit unless each enclosure is fitted with a floor of a material which prevents animal excreta from entering lower enclosures.
(g) Primary enclosures used to transport animals shall be maintained in a clean and sanitary condition.
(h) It shall be the responsibility of the attendant or driver to inspect the animals to determine whether they need emergency veterinary care, and if so, to immediately obtain such care from a licensed veterinarian.
(i) Primary enclosures used to house animals temporarily during the transport process (that is, holding facilities) shall meet the standards set forth in N.J.A.C. 8:23A-1.3, 1.5 and 1.7. No animal shall be held for more than 24 hours during transport.

8:23A-1.13 Records and administration
(a) There shall be kept at each kennel, pet shop, shelter or pound a record of all animals received and/or disposed of. Such record shall state the date each animal was received, description of animal, license number, breed, age and sex; name and address of person from whom acquired; date euthanized and method, or name and address of person to whom sold or otherwise transferred.
(b) These records shall be kept at the premises for 12 months after the date the animal is euthanized or removed from the establishment and shall be available to any agent of the municipal government, the local health department or the State Department of Health and Senior Services.
(c) Except as otherwise provided in this section, no kennel, pet shop, shelter or pound shall, within one year from the making thereof, destroy or dispose of any books, records, documents or other papers required to be maintained under these rules.
(d) The records required to be maintained under these rules shall be held for such period in excess of the one year period specified in (b) above as may be required to comply with any Federal, State or local law. When the local health department or State Department of Health and Senior Services notifies a kennel, pet shop, shelter or pound in writing that specified records shall be retained pending completion of an investigation or proceeding, such facility shall hold such records until their disposition is authorized by the local health department or the. State Department of Health and Senior Services.
(e) A licensee shall promptly notify the licensing agency of any change in his or her name and address, or any change in operations which may affect his or her status.